A Day In The Life of A Roadschooler-The Freedom To Learn Living Tiny

We are asked all of the time about how we Roadschool our kids.

“What do you do with them all day?”

“Do they do real school work?”

“How is what you’re doing better for your kid than public school?”

We get it. People question what they don’t understand. We’re actually grateful for the inquiry because we’d rather dispel any myths over having people assume our children aren’t getting a proper education.

Read more “A Day In The Life of A Roadschooler-The Freedom To Learn Living Tiny”

The Windy City’s Unseasonable Weather Brings out Tiny Home Warriors

Visiting Chicago’s Shaumburg Boomer Stadium for the first annual Chicago Tiny Home Show, presented by Titan Tiny Homes was something I’d been looking forward to since my invite months ago. I knew there would be super cool homes on display and speakers I’d want to hear present. I assumed there would be floor plans represented that’s I’d never seen before and really great people to meet.

What I didn’t anticipate was that it would feel like January instead of mid-May.

The crazy thing about the 2018 home show’s response to the freeing rain, arctic temps and sporadic storms rolling through was that the people still came. They came, they toured, they listened, they asked questions, and they just waited out the weather and joked about the cold.

Chicago, You. Are. Warriors.

I was impressed by the thousands who poured into the freshly mowed baseball stadium, still smiling and greeting me warmly with their coffee in hand. The show’s guests were glowing from their excitement from touring home after home with lofts and bump outs, slides and an array of toilet options. They were getting their questions answered and they had done their prep-work.

Presentations were given by Bob Clarizio of Titan Tiny Homes, Luke Thill “The Tiny House Kid”, and myself of The Mama On The Rocks. The guests at the show were able to hear about zoning, coding, land approval, DIY builds, material weights, downsizing and how to do it, and the possibilities of living tiny as a family. The weekend was packed and Saturday was full of energy.

Houses were on display from 18′ to 40′ and even virtual tours from Utopian Village. The monster 40′ tiny home from Texas showed up Friday night to prove that everything really is bigger in Texas! The slide out feature was a must-see and a definite fan favorite from Hill country Tiny Houses.

Everyone ooohhed and ahhhed over Titan’s display models, especially the sliding door entry of The Everest.

My husband came with me to the show for the first time and we barely spoke to each other because the folks stopping by our booth had such incredible questions. We were so impressed by their thorough research and well thought-out planning. People were so friendly and Titan were great hosts.

If you missed this year’s Chicago Tiny Home Show, be sure to check the website for more info on next year because it is a show you won’t want to miss!

How Big Is Too Big To Live Tiny In A How Big Is Too Big To Live Tiny In A Large Body?

Whether you are considering height (or lack thereof), weight, pregnancy, or the growth of children into teenagers, all changes in size should be considered when downsizing your living space. Many people wonder, and I get asked a lot, “How big is too big to live tiny in a large body?”

As a large female who is comfortable in my frame, I am happy to field this perfectly reasonable question.

In our experience with tiny house builders as well as our spending the better part of the last year living tiny, it all comes down to five things:

Bathrooms

No matter the height of the shower, the width of the bathtub, or the placement of the toilet, someone of size needs to consider the available space in a tiny house bathroom. Certain brands of toilets (like the Nature’s Head) sit up higher off of the ground, whereas a homemade composting variety can be build to suit. On the other hand, with low ceilings in most tiny house bathrooms, the shower height will be lower than most traditional home builds and the bathrooms, at their largest, are usually the size of an RV tub. This leaves little room for a relaxing bath for a new mom or for multiple kiddos.

Bedrooms

If you are of a large stature of any variety, the bedroom can be tricky business, but it can be done. Those who are tall should consider than many tinies, unless built into a custom design, won’t host a king sized bed or mattress. This leaves some of high stature with their feet dangling if it isn’t taken into consideration early on. Additionally, if a plus sized couple were to be in a full or queen bed, they may be less comfortable at night so keep that in might to allow more space during your build to walk around the bed or equip the room with a larger mattress.

Ceilings

Standard overall height for road capable THOWs (Tiny House On Wheels) is 13 feet. That is the maximum for being street legal (with up to an 8.5 ft width). This means you have to deduct the height of the roof, insulation, drywall and framework, etc.

Additionally, many tiny homes have one or more loft spaces for bedrooms or living areas. This can lower the overall interior height in some spaces down to under five feet (although, traditionally they stay at 6 ft.). This is an easy solve for taller home buyers/builders with the addition of the adjustable loft. These spaces can be raised and lowered by a variety of means such as pulleys or even removing the loft entirely. Many parents opt for this type of loft so they can enjoy the headroom in an upper bedroom until their lower level kiddos are tall enough to require the height adjustment.

Doorways

This concept follows along the lines of the ceiling heights. While many doorways are standard sized, some are shrunk for the purpose of space so front doors may have less width or a hallway might be more narrow. This includes the addition of galley kitchens or bar eating areas as space savers.

We have found the addition of pocket and/or sliding doors allows the privacy desired without the need to a non-adjusting or smaller sized door or hallway.

Seating

Many tiny homes use a bar style seating, foldable table or counter space, or stools for chairs. This can cause some struggle for short folks as well as those who are taller or weigh more than average. The simple solution is to adjust the height of seating or tables and to keep these in mind when building. We actually removed our original table, after finding it less than comfy and replaced it with a custom-built table that folds from a bar to a dining set with ease. It provides comfort and plenty of space and cost my husband less than $50 to make.

As with anything custom built, you can pretty much do whatever you want with your design. So this is a great way for people of all ages and sizes to experience the freedom tiny living has to offer!

How To Build A Killer Roadschool Room When Space Is Limited: 4 Tips To Make The Most Out Of Your Area

Living tiny with kids is something many argue cannot be done, but here we are–a year in and loving it. We have chosen to Roadschool our kids so we are able to continue traveling and exposing them to different cultures, a variety of customs, and real world learning. I work full time from an office space that has to be organized.

However, what do we do when it is rainy or when lessons involve the unavoidable worksheet or pen and paper classwork? We created a killer Roadschool space inside our rig that can accommodate our individual learner’s needs. So, keep in mind that every student learns differently, but these tips can be applied to creating everything from a preschool area to a high school room, a professional office to a crafting space in your tiny.

Make Large Items Foldable

Desks and shelving can take up a lot of space in a tiny home so making the best use of vertical space is crucial. A wall mounted desk can save on both space as well as create a place for storage. Many of these desks have internal storage for office supplies as well as the work space.

Shelving can also fold down and back up for when they are being used or when they need to be stored to travel.

Organize The Small Things

Whether you choose bins, containers, or totes, small things can get lost in a tiny house so keeping them organized is important. We recommend using a small metal rolling cart and magnetized bins, buckets, and small containers so the inside and outside of each shelf are most efficiently used.

Visibly Separate Space

Use items like rugs and shelving to break up a larger open space into smaller more divided rooms without putting up walls. We use a large rug to separate our office/Roadschool space from the rest of our kids’ room. Open shelving that you can see through are also a great option for dividing space.

Make The Space Creative

Whether you brighten it up with paint, decorate it with decals, or create a photo collage, make the space somewhere you want to be. We use a bright color palate, kid-friendly wall decals and trendy items like a globe and succulents to bring the outdoors in. Always incorporate natural light whenever possible as well in order to make a small space seem larger.

Whenever Possible, Make Space Multi-Functional

So our Roadschool room doubles as my office space just as much as the bar area in our kitchen is used for studying and eating dinner. Whether you use large items like a Murphy bed that doubles as shelving or storage that is also decorative, in a tiny home, real estate is a hot commodity so most designs need to be space-saving and multi-functional.

5 Things to Watch Out For When Buying Used

From cars to houses, making a large purchase comes with big commitment. No matter what two people you ask, you will likely get different responses on the how to’s of making this financial decision.

Buying or building tiny does come with its own caveats that differ from the traditional home buying or building process. While they share some similarities, everything from price to the build itself can vary. So here are five things to watch out for if you plan to buy used and why we recommend building instead.

Trailer

When building a THOW (Tiny House On Wheels) you aren’t just building a trailer to haul wood or even farm animals. You are building a home that will carry for family and that must have the ability to be safely moved from one location to the next.

The quality of the trailer should be taken into consideration every bit as much as the house itself. Buyers should beware of rust, pre-used trailers, the length, the axles, the number of tires, as well as how the home is affixed to the trailer. This shouldn’t be taken lightly and should be thoroughly inspected by a professional.

Appliances

This is maybe the biggest area where THOW builders can cut corners to fit a house into a buyer’s budget. This doesn’t mean they outfit a home unsafely, it just means a buyer may choose to downgrade the brand name or the size of something in order to fit for space or financial restrictions on the build.

For instance, a popular THOW might come standard with an apartment refrigerator and an electric cooktop. An upgrade would be a residential fridge, a propane or electric full-sized stove, or the addition of a dishwasher or washer/dryer. These are easy things to cut out when wedding the list of wants into needs for a budget-friendly build.

Plumbing & Electrical

For these to be installed safely, just as in a traditional house, they must be done correctly and [usually] by a professional. Cutting corners and DIY-ing this step could be disastrous. If you are buying used, you can never be sure of what is behind the walls. While we love to be trusting of our beloved tiny community, there are still dishonest people out there. Please have anything used professionally inspected before buying.

Insulation

Another area of great debate in the tiny house community is how to keep their house warm. Buyers can choose everything from recycled denim to organic wool, spray foam or the traditional pink panther rolls of your average Joe construction supply store. The cost on some of these materials can skyrocket the overall price tag on a new or used tiny. Be sure you are getting what you want and researching the longevity and R-value of your product.

Materials

Consider everything from siding to windows, counter tops to storage. All of these variables will weigh in on the overall hauling rate (weight) of your THOW, the safety when traveling, and the overall durability. If you plan to move a lot with your home, you might consider tempered windows to withstand whatever the highway might throw at them. If you will be in below freezing temps, you need to upgrade to double paned. cedar vs vinyl siding is also a consideration.

Do your research or employ a professional inspector who is familiar with THOWs if you plan on buying used.

So Why Do We Recommend Building New?

Like anything else, you can’t know if you are getting a lemon until you’re stuck with it. You can’t simply return a house because you found things you didn’t like. As any home buyer knows, a month into the purchase, you will still be discovering things you were blind to when you were just excited to make the purchase.

This is a house. For many, this is forever. Building tiny homes can range from $10,000 (DIY, kit build, and basics) to upwards of $140,000 (for top-of-the-line and customized all inclusives). However, if you compare this to just single family, entry level stick-built homes, you are still saving tens of thousands of dollars. So do this the right way so you won’t end up regretting your purchase. Find a reliable builder, and plan for your dream home.

11 Easy Ways to Downsize and Simplify, No Matter What Size Your Home

Downsizing and going tiny isn’t for everyone, but purging your closets and countertops of unwanted and unnecessary stacks of stuff is not only good for your household but great for your soul. Many articles support that clutter encourages anxiety. So, let’s partner together on this organizational journey.

While my planner may be color-coded, sometimes my house isn’t. So, here are some simple ways even the messiest can become a minimalist.

Start Small: One Room at a Time

Right after Christmas, even though we live in a 36 foot camper, I felt like I couldn’t look somewhere that there wasn’t a stack of something about to attack me. I felt like I was about to be on an episode of Hoarders. So, I started with my pantry. No, it didn’t help with the piles of Christmas gifts and the graveyard of wrapping paper, but it was a small area that I could control. Once I finished that, the feeling of accomplishment was motivation to move on to something bigger.

Find Joy: If You Don’t Love It, It Has To Go

This was the mantra in our house before downsizing from over 2000 square feet to less than 300. Some studies suggest holding each item of clothing or trinket from your bookshelf in your had and if it doesn’t bring joy or trigger a positive memory, it has to go. So we are now left with only the things that have deep meaning for us or clothes and shoes that sincerely make us feel good.

Make Piles: Keep, Donate, Give Away, Trash

This gets easier the more you do it, trust me. Once you start throwing things into boxes, you get on a roll and it is so freeing to let things go. It feels great to donate to those who need the clothes you haven’t fit into since high school and then you have space in your closet for things you actually feel comfortable wearing. make sure not to let the boxes sit around cluttering up your space. Take them where they were designated and wash your hands of what you let go.

Make a Schedule: Rotate Which Rooms You Tidy Up

Once you’ve cleaned out and decluttered, make yourself an easy-to-follow schedule that rotates rooms in your house. Beyond your typical doing laundry and cleaning up leftovers, it will keep you from becoming overwhelmed to know that on Mondays you clean the bathrooms and on Wednesdays you straighten the living room, and so on. We also get our kids involved. Our six year old is an expert at taking out the trash and vacuuming and our almost tow year old loves to unload the dirty and clean laundry baskets. It teaches them responsibility and helps them feel like they are contributing to the family chores.

Counters Aren’t For Storage

This the main culprit of cleanliness-related mom anxiety. Why must we have piles of hair ties, a collection of Legos, and a mountain of bills and junk mail covering our counter tops? For the love of organization, throw. It. Out!

A clean counter in your kitchen will provide endless happiness for mom and send all of the unwanted treasures usually found there to their rightful locations. Then, if Suzy can’t wear a ponytail Monday or Johnny’s Lego truck only has three wheels, they will learn to pick up after themselves.

If You Haven’t Worn It/Used It In The Last Year, Say Bye-Bye

As a woman of pretty solid size, this one is hard. But what if i lose weight? Or But what if I gain some back? I like to be prepared.

However, some of us are hanging on to our pre-teen N*SYNC concert t-shirt and, sister, that reunion tour ain’t happening! We need to move on.

So, go through your closet, dresser drawers, show racks, and handbag holders, and throw out or donate everything you haven’t worn in the last year (six months is actually preferable). I promise you will be shocked at how many items this eliminates if we are truly honest with ourselves.

Rid Yourself of Expired Items

I have no explanation as to why many of us shop and hold onto pantry items like we are living through the Great Depression, but honey, this isn’t 1930! Even folks like me who know the struggle of Ramen noodles and paycheck-to-paycheck living can usually afford to replace the ranch dressing they’ve had open in their fridge since New Kids on The Block were actually new.

Many women have makeup that used to line the shelves of our 8th grade Caboodle case and hair accessories we haven’t worn since our headbands were hand-decorated with puffy paint. WHY!? Friends, can we have a collective trash bag frenzy please!?

Buy Quality Over Quantity

Okay, admittedly, this one might hurt a little at first but you have to trust me on this. When you cut your closet contents in half (or, in our case, by 80%), you want to sincerely love the things that remain. This means that when you buy a new item, you not only remove an old one, but you should also be buying things that will last.

I was just able to replace three mediocre sweaters with one from Patagonia that I honestly love and is versatile enough to wear traveling or to the office. The initial cost on these items seems higher, but when you can get 10+ years of wear out of them, your investment was well worth it!

Invest In Things That Have More Than One Use

This is a tiny living mantra. If it only has one use, I don’t need it. We need a coffee pot that doubles as a hot water maker, a can opener that opens bottles of wine and beer, and a table that is also a prep space and desk.

If you look at buying items, especially the larger purchases for your home, as needing to be multi-functional, you will spend less money and have less ‘stuff’.

For Everything There Is A Place 

Whether you live in a tiny house or a mansion, there should be some sort of order. Our kids know that they each have two toy bins. If new toys won’t fit, they have to rid themselves of enough old ones to make room or they have a choice to make.

My husband and I know that our wall-mounted mail holder will only hold so much so eventually we will have to go through it, separate it, and pay bills or respond to mail. In our old, larger home, mail would pile up, collect dust, and remain unopened.

This same rule should apply for kitchen items, pantry food, tools and gardening, and everything else one might keep in or around their home.

Some Things Are More Worth Your Money Than Your Time

This is an important step and one I am continuing to learn from. Whether you are a traveling single or a settled family, a retiree or a divorcee starting over, you have responsibilities. Sometimes our money is worth more than our time.

This means, instead of stressing over the heart-wrenching fact that I honestly cannot keep up with my family’s laundry on top of writing, a full time job, motherhood, wifing, and the everyday of running a household, it is a worthwhile investment to pay a dry cleaner to launder our clothes or a housekeeper to clean the toilets. There is no shame in that sister! It isn’t defeat. It is working smarter, not harder.

Three Things We’ve Learned Since Going Tiny Allowed Us To Pay Off Debt

When we decided to minimize, simplify, and downsize to tiny home living a year ago, financial freedom was one of our driving motivators. Ours is a hard-working family who still lived paycheck to paycheck due to circumstances like medical bills and living in areas of high poverty and low employment (therefore, the living wage was well below the national average).

Since we have sold our traditional house and gone tiny, we have been able to pay off all existing debt, with the exception of one medical bill. We have also been able to build a savings that is allowing us to both travel this summer for the first time since having kids, and to experience the freedom that comes without worrying when the next payday will arrive.

So, here is a list of the top three things we are learning as we’ve downsized to tiny life and paid off debt.

  1. Watching Cash Leave your Hand Is Physically Painful

Since being budget conscious by choice instead of necessity, our perspective has changed. It is pretty amazing what kind of turnaround happens when you pay cash for all things outside of automatic online bill payments.

When I have to physically watch Stacy at the gas station take the $10 bill out of my icy cold grip in exchange for a soda and a bag of Sun Chips, friends, I am seriously reconsidering my snack choices!  Paying cash helps to keep tight control of unnecessary expenditures as well as allows you the freedom to save up money without having it show up in you account to be spent on things like groceries or gas.

 

  1. Beating Your Budget Becomes Addicting

Once you get in the habit of creating a monthly budget (it takes a while, just like any habit), you will be able to track how much money you have coming in and how much you have going out in various categories each month.

Maybe it is because I am competitive, but this has driven myself and my husband to compete in who can save the most/spend the least, as well as trying to spend less each month in certain expense categories, such as couponing for groceries and buying in bulk to save.

 

  1. Mo’ Money Doesn’t Have To Equal More Spending

When you live tiny, you generally keep what you need when you downsize from your traditional house or apartment. This means that, unlike moving into a new traditionally built home, new tiny home owners generally don’t need to go buy a bunch of ‘stuff’.

However, if things come up or something that you want goes on sale, you should have a miscellaneous budget item or cash savings. This should be a built in part of your monthly financial plan.

So, let’s say you decided to save money in your tiny house build by using a handmade composting toilet to start and now you are ready to upgrade to a Nature’s Head Composting Toilet. If you haven’t saved the $975 to buy it, you have to wait. This is great monetary modeling if you have kids, as well!

 

So You Wanna Go Tiny? Let’s Talk Toilets!

When catching up with tiny house builders across the country, they all agree on one thing: They talk about toilets…a lot!

Why Are Toilets Such A Big Deal?

When building a traditional home, toilets are pretty much basic outside of fancy upgrades like a dual flushing. When you are talking about a build that allows your house to move around, you have to consider all of the options for plumbing since many aren’t connected to traditional water and sewer/septic. This can also come with a hefty price tag so, in the tiny house world, toilets are actually considered a luxury item for many interested in saving space and saving money.

Things to Consider

-Cost: Handmade composting toilets can be built for under $50, while some other types can cost up to $3500. Your budget can be seriously impacted by your choice of commode, so choose wisely.

-Odor: Many people worry hard about how their toilet might smell, depending on what type they choose. Do your research. Composting toilets, if maintained correctly, shouldn’t smell. Incinerating toilets have their own smell. You have to choose how important this is to your quality of life.

-Emptying Options: Make sure you have someone living in your tiny who is comfortable emptying the waste, whether it is being drained outside or taken to the compost pile. If not, choose traditional flushing and have plans for plumbing and sewer hook ups.

-Space: Depending on your choice and brand, some toilets can be large since they hold the waste in a self-contained tank. Other options can be built to suit or can be moveable within your bathroom space. This should be a priority consideration when building a home under 400 square feet.

What Are Your Options?

  1. Homemade Composting- This is the least expensive option and the easiest to maintain, however it is the one that freaks people out the most. For this, you can use anything from a bucket with a foam seat to building a box set up with a traditional toilet seat and use pine shavings to cover odor. A urine diverter will help with smell and when you empty the waste.
  2. Working/Active Composting- This is a more pricey choice, but it has minimal upkeep and thus is a very popular choice among most tiny home builders. You can get one that is self-contained, or remote. Self contained are larger because they contain the waste in the bottom of the toilet, while remotes hold the waste in a separate location-typically outside or underneath the THOW.
  3. Incinerator- Another pricey investment, but with no worries of emptying compost, this toilet type burns the waste into an ash deposit. That being said, this does come with its own odor and can require a significant amount of energy to run.
  4. Traditional Flushing- This is just like what anyone is used to but it does require a full time hook up to sewage or septic. So, for THOWs, it really isn’t an option.
  5. RV Toilet- It is what it sounds like. For this option, you will need a holding tank and a place to brain it when it fills up. It does use minimal water per flush but you will need to consider special toilet paper so it breaks down fast in your holding tank.
  6. Dry Toilet- Another option to allow you to live off grid and without the requirement of plumbing, this type of toilet uses cartridges filled with silver liners that, when flushed, wraps the waste SUPER tight to prevent odor from escaping. Once the liners are full, you simply empty them out and replace the cartridge. These toilets are cheaper to install, but the liners are a maintenance cost to consider.

What Do We Use?

Since we are currently living in a 36 foot fifth wheel while saving to build, we use a traditional RV toilet. We really appreciate the water conservation aspect and we use a draining service for a separate large holding tank (500 gallons) when parked. This allows us to drain our tanks while we are on the road but also have a constant system when we are parked for longer periods of time.

What Do We Recommend?

Nature’s Head Active Composting Toilet This is one of the most popularly installed toilets for tiny home builders across the U.S. because they are more affordable than other brands/types and easy to maintain. While some models can rung in closer to $1200, this one won’t break the bank during your build at $975.

Founder and CEO of Titan Tiny Homes says, “The main reason we have decided to use natures head toilets as our go to composting toilet is because it is the only toilet officially recognized by the RVIA.”

 

Surviving Simplified Living With Kids: 5 Must-Know Tips

5 Must-Know Tips About Living Tiny With Kids

The tiny living movement is growing wildly in popularity. However, it is important to evaluate things before you decide to downsize-especially if you have kids in tow.

We have been living in under 300 square feet for almost a year now and loving every minute of it. Our kids honestly thrive on this lifestyle and haven’t been concerned about downsizing their belongings or their living space.

When considering going tiny with kids, it is possible to not only survive but to sincerely love this life.

Here are our top 5 must-know tips for surviving tiny living with kids:

Brynn and son at the aquarium posing on a shark

Downsize Their Toys And Upgrade To Adventures

When we were going through our purging stages to prep for downsizing, we had our kids lay out one bin of toys at a time. They’d count each of them all lined up in a row and then divide them in half. Half of the toys stayed, and the other half were sold or given away. We repeated this process several times before we were ready for tiny life and now we do so about every 6 six weeks. We researched this method in one of our favorite books, Simplicity Parenting. This simplification was a massive help to our son’s sensory disorder as well.

This process of parting with things was much more difficult for us as parents than for our children. However, this gave them responsibility for what stayed and what went. This was really empowering for them, and it took the ‘bad guy’ role off of our backs.

Now, instead of buying them an abundance of stuff, they now get most gifts in the form of experiences. Last year both kids got a membership to our local zoo, and we have used that more times than I can count. Bonus: This counts toward our son’s Roadschooling hours! We’ve been able to afford to get them monthly subscriptions to educational packages or short trips that we wouldn’t have afforded before downsizing, and they love it so much more!

Get Them OutdoorsYoung male climbing on rocks

This element is a crucial part of our tiny life. We are on the move even when we are parked. Our current spot is on a 20-acre farm that has a many mile bike path right outside our back door. The park is exactly 1.3 miles to the left, and a local skydiving company is 3 miles to the right. Our kids have already seen and experienced so much more of life at 6 and one years old than I did by adulthood.

Some of our favorite ways to pass the time are rock climbing, park hopping, bike riding, and hiking. Our kiddos love to splash and explore in creeks, dig in the dirt, and swim anywhere we’ll let them. I cannot tell you what this type of free play in nature does for kids. They are learning real-world lessons, leave no trace policies, survival skills, problem-solving, collaboration, and natural consequences every single day. It. Is. AWESOME.

The bonus of getting outside together means you don’t even notice the reduced living space inside your tiny house because the outside is so vast. And nothing beats an afternoon nap in your Eno hammock!

Trade In And Trade Up

 

young child holding a ball outsideOur kids know that when we are in a new place or shopping at Target if they want to ask for something new like kids do, that they have to trade something in. They cannot get something new, just as we don’t, without giving something up.

Whether it is clothes, toys, books, or movies, our kids expect that we will do clean outs every few weeks and give away anything we haven’t used, played with, or worn since the last purge. They have come to enjoy the feeling of bringing joy to others by donating what they have been blessed with. It brings new meaning to the generosity and gives them hands-on experience serving others.

Give Them Their Own SpaceYoung boy next to christmas tree in a tiny home

When living tiny, I cannot stress enough how important it is to have a special place in the house for each person. The kiddos are no different. They need a space that they can decorate and enjoy and run to whenever they need privacy.

In our kids’ room, we chose to remove one set of bunk beds to build a space that includes a homeschool area for our boy with a folding desk and wobble seat as well as a sensory/calming area. This consists of a bean bag chair (Click HERE for 66% off), a climbing wall, a reading nook, and access to calming toys.

Organize Their Must-Haves

a picture of baskets to help organize a tiny homeIf baskets were currency, we’d be rich! Our kids have two fabric bins each to put their toys. That means, if it doesn’t fit, they can’t keep it. All of their Roadschool materials have their own basket (Click HERE for 60% off), and we organize their school supplies in magnetic tins (Click HERE for 50% off a set of 2) and metal buckets that are stored in a rolling utility cart for easy access to taking school outside.

This type of storage makes clean up a breeze and allows us to take toys or school supplies on the go without a second thought.

Organizing the Space In Your Tiny Home

How to efficiently organize your tiny home

Intentionally reducing your living space by 1000% (You read that right) means you have to get creative how you store, organize, and keep the items that made the cut when you purged your belongings. Making the most of your vertical space is the key to making the most out of a tiny living area.

Hanging Baskets

We swear by these because they are so versatile, can be decorative, and they are incredible forms of storage and organization. We have baskets to hang everything from hairdryers and hairbrushes to soaps and feminine products in our master bath. We use them as an alternative to an end table beside our couch to hold our drink, phone, and remote. In the bedrooms, they hold books for our kiddos and our phone, chapstick, and book in our room.

One cool trick we saw on Pinterest was to use the three-tiered wall mounted fruit baskets for everything outside of the kitchen! We have used these for everything from fruit and potatoes to toilet paper and bath towels. It is important, when living tiny, to look at everything as a storage option!

3M Hooks

We should have bought stock in these puppies before downsizing! In an effort to save our limited wall space from damage, we use these to hang literally everything. We use their hooks to hang the hanging baskets, bookbags, coats, and bath towels. We use the velcro picture hangers to hang all of our family portraits, canvases, and artwork. These are amazing and totally worth the small investment.

Shower Caddies Aren’t Just For The Bathroom

Take it back to the idea of a wall mounted fruit basket for storing bath towels, we use shower caddies in the shower for soap and washcloths and also hanging inside of our cabinets to store everything from bottled spices to foil and boxes of sandwich baggies. These over-the-door hanging options are genius! Click HERE for 40% off!

Elevated Storage Drawers

We bought a couple of the inexpensive, plastic three-drawer bins and we built a loft shelf above our children’s Road school area where we use them to store workbooks, school supplies, paper, and more. They are great for organizing and storing things that need to stay out of the reach of kiddos. Click HERE for 50% a set of two of these drawers!

Creative Art Hanging

We hang our kids’ artwork on a piece of painted pallet wood with clothespins on it. This looks like intentional farmhouse wall décor and makes it super easy to change things out as they make new creations. Another option is to hang clipboards and change out artwork in the same manner as the clothespins.

Use Slides And Shelves Like A Mantle


In our 36 ft tiny we have a slide out in the living room area. When it came to decorating for the holidays, I was really missing out on the beautiful fireplace in our former home. To pacify my love of decorating, we use the wooden framing on our slide as a fireplace mantle and still decorate for each holiday season. It brightens our home and keeps things festive for our kids.

If You Love It Then You Need To Throw A Magnet On It

From spices to knives, hair accessories and school supplies, we hang about 40% of the items in our tiny by a magnet. In our kitchen, we use the magnetic metal of our stove hood to mount our spices and our cooking timer. We hung a heavy duty magnetic strip on the wall beside our fridge for our sharp cutting knives. In the bathroom, hair ties and jewelry hang by magnets. And we use magnetic spice tins to hang googly eyes, puff balls, and small school supplies from the outside of our rolling Roadschool utility cart. Click HERE for 60% off the magnetic strips we use that hold everything!

Hang Your Drinkware

Two Christmases ago, as we researched and prepped to go tiny, my husband made me a pallet wood decoration that says “How I Tell Time” and it has two coffee mug hooks with “AM” and two wine glass hooks with “PM.” It is hilarious, accurate, and super practical! When you are living on wheels, you have to be mindful of the storage of glassware. This keeps everything hung up, secure and taking up zero space in cupboards or on countertops.

Throw Your Mail In The Air

For our mail, we use a wooden desk caddy that was meant to set on a desk and hold pens and pencils. Since it durable and has several compartments, we use it for almost all of the things that would normally just get tossed onto a table or counter. This is beautiful for two reasons: 1. It saves on the valuable real estate of our counters. 2. It looks decorative and it light enough to hang with 3D Adhesive Velcro.